Genesis Hansen arrest

Updated: Monday, Oct. 21 at 6 a.m. Original story, including witness videos, below.

Editor’s note: Genesis Hansen is employed as a columnist with Orange Media Network. The Daily Barometer is a part of OMN. 

Correction: The article stated that since bicycles are considered a vehicle under ORS 814.400, meaning police officers can require presentation of identification after lawfully stopping someone on a bicycle. However, though bicycles are considered a vehicle in some instances, there is not a statutory requirement that bicycle riders must present identification when lawfully pulled over for a traffic violation.

After the recent arrest of an Oregon State University student by the Oregon State Police, which may not have been justified, community members are seeking answers and the university has stated its intent to potentially reevaluate its relationship with OSP.

Genesis Hansen, a fourth-year OSU student and English and philosophy double major, was arrested by Oregon State Police Trooper Kelly Katsikis on charges of interfering with an OSP officer in the form of refusing to show identification after being pulled over while bicycling, and resisting arrest, on Sunday, Oct. 13. During the interaction between Hansen and police, witness Gabby Johnson said she thinks the arresting officers were unnecessarily rough with Hansen, throwing her to the ground during the arrest.

According to Benton County District Attorney John Haroldson, Hansen may have been within the law in refusing to present her identification. 

Lieutenant Craig Flierl of the Oregon State Police told The Baro it would be inappropriate for him to comment on this particular case. 

OSP’s Public Information Officer, Steve Mitchell, gave a statement on Wednesday, Oct. 23, as reported by the Corvallis Gazette-Times. Mitchell said the matter is under review, as is standard practice with Use of Force incidents, and criminal charges have been referred to the Benton County DA’s office.

Haroldson said, at the time of interview, that the only material from the arrest he has reviewed is the body cam footage from Katsikis, but it is possible Hansen should not have been charged.

“I do not see anything that could be charged criminally,” said Haroldson.

Although bicycles are considered a vehicle under ORS 814.400, and a driver’s license must be presented when lawfully stopped while driving a car, there is no statutory requirement stating that bike riders must provide identification when stopped by police. 

The question of whether the amount of force used by OSP was legally justified or not, partially depends on whether or not the arrest itself was lawful. 

“If an arrest occurs unlawfully, any force used after that should not occur,” Haroldson said. 

Oregon State Police contracts with Oregon State University to provide traffic enforcement on campus, extra security and access to resources beyond what campus security officers can provide, according to the OSU Public Safety website. 

Hansen was initially pulled over for a failure to drive within the line, a traffic violation. 

Corvallis Police Chief Jon Sassaman said to the Gazette-Times that while he did not want to comment on the question of whether racial bias  was involved in the initial stop, he believes the state trooper’s video shows no sign of excessive force, only an establishing of control.

The body cam footage from the incident, reviewed by The Baro, is nearly 40 minutes long, though it does not begin until after Katsikis has already pulled Hansen over. 

In the footage, Hansen asks to see the legislation she has been pulled over for breaking, as well as the legislation allowing the officer to demand her identification. 

The officer informs her why she has been pulled over, but does not state which law necessitates the presentation of identification. The two speak for about half an hour, as backup officers arrive. During that time, Hansen mentions she is wary of the situation because she is African-American. Ultimately, Katsikis tells her if she does not present her identification, he will arrest her. 

“I don’t answer questions” is Hansen’s response, and officers reach forward to grab her. She ends up on the ground. Bystanders voice their concern, and again, when Hansen asks to sit up, is granted permission, tries to sit up unassisted and is forced back to the ground by the officers. 

Witness videos can be seen currently on The Baro’s website. 

According to an email sent by OSP Communications Director Mindy McCartt, the OSP aims to release the body cam footage early this week in an effort to be transparent. However, according to ORS 192.355, all faces in the video must be rendered unidentifiable before the footage is released. 

The university released an initial statement on Tuesday via Steve Clark, vice president of University Relations and Marketing, stating awareness of the incident and an ask of “law enforcement authorities to de-escalate situations involving OSU students.”

Tuesday evening, Clark said in an interview with The Baro that the university believes there was no indication of racial bias in this matter.

On Friday, OSU President Ed Ray sent an all-school email reiterating that OSU has reviewed footage from the event, been in contact with law enforcement and asked for de-escalation practices to be used. He also said the university has asked that local law enforcement policies and practices be examined for evidence of implicit and explicit bias. 

“Let me be clear, this matter is sufficiently troublesome that unless its resolution is satisfactory to OSU, we will reassess the value of continuing a campus law enforcement services agreement with Oregon State Police,” states the letter from Ray.

The letter also says, “we recognize that a comment made earlier this week to a reporter that the university believed there was no indication of bias in this matter was inappropriate, hurt our community and should not have been made, as it added to the challenges of this week. This comment has since been clarified by the university’s spokesman in further statements to the media indicating OSU cannot judge bias based upon the video evidence.”

According to the letter, OSU will continue to look into the situation, provide resources to those affected and meet with community members to work on building safe relationships between law enforcement and students. 

Hansen is a person of color, an identity which some have alleged influenced the way police acted. After Hansen posted videos of her arrest on Twitter, words of support for her and anger at the arresting officers began to pour in.

Johnson said she wants to see the officers involved be evaluated and offer an apology to Hansen. Johnson thinks the incident did not initially seem bad until the officers called for backup and six more officers appeared on the scene.

“I’m baffled at how poorly they acted in the situation,” Johnson said. “You see those videos on Twitter and they upset you, but it’s just online, so it’s not as personal. It felt like one of those, but in real life.” 

Johnson said she would like to see the police force do more to work toward equal treatment and care of the community. 

“They made me feel unsafe in our community, honestly,” Johnson said. 

Hansen was transported to the Benton County Jail after her arrest and subsequently released on citations.



Editor's note: Original story below

 

Social media backlash spread after an Oregon State University student was arrested on Sunday with what some are calling excessive force.

Genesis Hansen, a fourth-year OSU student and English and philosophy double major, was arrested on charges of interfering with an Oregon State Police officer in the form of refusing to show identification after being pulled over while bicycling, and resisting arrest, according to the Oregon State Police log. During the interaction between Hansen and police, witness Gabby Johnson said she thinks the arresting officers were unnecessarily rough with Hansen, throwing her to the ground during the arrest. Lieutenant Craig Flierl of the Oregon State Police said it would be inappropriate for him to comment on this particular case at this time. 

Oregon State Police contracts with Oregon State University to provide traffic enforcement on campus, extra security and access to resources, according to the OSU Public Safety website. 

Hansen is a person of color, an identity which some have alleged influenced the way police acted. After Hansen posted videos of her arrest on Twitter, words of support for her and anger at the arresting officers began to pour in.

Johnson said she wants to see the officers involved be evaluated and offer an apology to Hansen. The Daily Barometer has not yet been able to attain specific details of the arrest from police, but according to Johnson, Hansen was initially pulled over by an officer for riding her bike on the incorrect side of the street. 

Johnson said she thinks the incident did not initially seem bad until the officers called for backup and six more officers appeared on the scene. According to Johnson, some of the officers were ignoring the bystanders while others were antagonizing people for recording the incident on their phones. 

“There were two grown men, she’s like a five-foot tall, 100-pound girl, and they threw her to the ground,” Johnson said. “We were all screaming and crying in the street, it was really intense.” 

Johnson said the officers were not providing Hansen with the specific laws she was breaking or their personal identification information. 

“I’m baffled at how poorly they acted in the situation,” Johnson said. “You see those videos on Twitter and they upset you, but it’s just online so it’s not as personal. It felt like one of those but in real life.” 

Johnson said she would like to see the police force do more to work toward equal treatment and care of the community. 

“They made me feel unsafe in our community, honestly,” Johnson said. 

Hansen was transported to the Benton County Jail after her arrest and subsequently released on citations.

Bicycles are considered a vehicle under ORS 814.400, meaning police officers can require presentation of identification after lawfully stopping someone on a bicycle. 

This story will be updated as more information becomes available. 

(46) comments

Erick606

1. It is good that police will pull over bicycles that do not obey the rules and most do not 2. If people think they are not treated fairly the bridge out of town is open and they are free to leave. 3. This looks like either a publicity stunt or a reporter that wants a story


bennysbestfriend

1. it's not like they have better things to do with their time. 2. you think you can just leave police brutality and other injustices behind in one town? 3. who would do this for a publicity stunt? really?


Jess

Unbelievable a publicity stunt? Absolutely not, I’m sure also believe people should leave the country if they are unhappy rather than work to make things better for all that reside here. Seen all the videos you must not have.


not.the.whole.story

Have you seen all the videos, including the police body cam videos? I'm fairly certain you haven't. Would you have the courage to retract all the blame and hate your espousing if those videos showed a different story than the one you've been led to believe?


sw_pdx

Simple. Comply with officers directions. Do not sass, struggle, or otherwise escalate the situation. You will lose. You might even be kinda right....but you will lose.


EndlessWheel134

Oregon is not a Need to Identify state


bennysbestfriend

simple. officers should de-escalate situations and should not be trained to see people as potential threats. they should not be trained to default to unnecessary force.


not.the.whole.story

It is really simple. But perhaps, instead of speaking of training you likely know very little about, why don't you request a ride along from your local policy agency? That would certainly open your eyes and help improve your overall education on policing and the extensive training that all officers have.


nicknitro

There is no statutory requirement that bike riders must show ID if stopped for a traffic violation. she is going to win a nice settlement ..

SaintJacques

Everyone in the Corvallis community has long known that the Corvallis police force has a penchant for using excessive force against marginalized citizens and people of race. Since the 2005 police department shooting (at point blank range) of a mentally ill man, there have been numerous reports of police brutality and malfeasance. I know Genesis Hansen personally, as she has been my teaching assistant and student in numerous classes. She is beloved among the student body, and is known as a gentle soul with the highest integrity and poise. The fact that the Corvallis police felt inclined to resort to violence and a disgraceful lack of proper procedure only underscores the lack of true political leadership in the Corvallis community. Heads up for Mayor Biff Traber: it's time to rein the watchdogs in. Once again, they've let our diverse community town and taken things too far. Let's not make the same mistake we made back in 2005, and shove these acts under the carpet. It's time to take action now.


TruthMatters

This statement is made as if you are aware of the facts. Instead of assuming you understand what happened and comparing this incident in such an overly dramatic way, seek out facts. These statements escalate and infuriate. Instead be concerned about the truth. Add to the betterment of society instead of retracting from it.


Rida2919

I don't see the excessive force. What does anyone expect when they pull back and resist when being placed under arrest. Regardless of the right or wrong of the situation, failure to comply in that moment only ends poorly for everyone. File your protest or complaint. There will always be time for that as long as you aren't trying to make your case while staring down a gun...


bennysbestfriend

you try being a small person and having two grown men force you to the ground and hold you down, that's excessive.


Jess

You don’t see excessive force? She is literally not even 100 lbs to their combined weight of probably 375 to 400 lbs they lunge towards her and shove her to the ground because she poses a threat? Then when they tell her she can sit up when she attempts because she tells she doesn’t need there help to sit up they grab her and yank her back into the dirt pulling her left foot with excessive force. Barley 100 lbs. regardless of right or wrong police officers need to use appropriate measures for the situation and that was not appropriate even the school is saying going forward they are requesting that police deescalate because what happened was wrong


BernieBeliever

Sounds like another SJW found out the hard way that the real world laws actually apply to her. Too bad her pals at the Barometer just took her word for it and didn't actually do any investigation before writing the headline. I'd like to see the body cam that shows the ENTIRE encounter.


bennysbestfriend

OSU reviewed the body cam footage, Steve Clark is quoted as saying "Going forward, we will ask law enforcement authorities to de-escalate situations involving OSU students". that sounds a lot like the situation was escalated in ways it didn't need to be.


TruthMatters

I would take what Clark says with grain of salt. That statement could be made to placate students to minimize the chance of student unrest. It is an easier statement to make.


not.the.whole.story

Steve Clark also said that students need to comply with federal and state laws. Perhaps there should have been compliance where there was none.


Jess

SJW? So you do not believe that people should take a stand to ensure that everyone is treated fairly? Laws apply to everyone it just happens that certain people don’t get harassed as much as others simply because of their color of their skin, and not speaking out against those injustices makes one just as compliant in the unfair treatment


caspertheghost

Two one minute videos don't cut it. I want to see what happened leading up to it. Context matters, and I'd like to have more information before I make a judgment.







Regardless, it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. If you refuse to comply with a lawful order, expect to pay the price.


bennysbestfriend

do you really think that's an excuse to be treated like that? OSU reviewed body cam footage, read that. sounds a lot like whoever reviewed it agreed that this was unprofessional and escalated a situation that didn't need to be.


DJohnson567

I don't know what people expect when they're talked to by the police and they think they can just not provide ID or respond to commands by police officers. She clearly was resisting arrest not cooperating with a police investigation and has obvious lack of respect for the laws and authority and police officers. And all of these sjws watching think that their voice is going to be heard and that they can get away with breaking the law they're lucky they didn't get arrested for interfering with a police investigation and preventing an arrest. God bless the police. Think of it like this they pull someone over for riding on the wrong side of the road they have a weapon on them and there's two officers there are they going to pause and look at each other and say hey Murphy why don't you arrest this one because she's only a hundred pounds and I'm just going to sit here and watch that's not how it works they do what they need to to make the arrest and take control of the situation and they're there to help each other out so excessive force you don't know what that is look at other police videos and Cleveland or Chicago or the recent shooting of a woman in Texas in her own home . and quite frankly bicyclists who think they can just ride all willy-nilly and not follow the city ordinance deserve to get tickets just like someone in a vehicle driving on the wrong side of the road. She thinks that she's better than everyone else and doesn't have to follow the lies well this is the police doing their job thank you officers for doing your job and God bless you and stay safe out there.


bennysbestfriend

citations are quite different from getting physically treated like this; not following a road ordinance is no excuse. police have treated other demographics of people with more respect in situations far more dangerous to their personal safety.


OSUgradStudent

Okay, but it would be nice to know whether she provided her identifying info so the citation could have commenced without a 30+ minute ordeal. It would have been an extremely small fine that she could have gone to court and fought there rather than on the street. I get standing up for yourself, but do it in a responsible manner--don't try to fight/argue with every police officer that you come into contact with because they can haul you in. Why do that to yourself? Take the citation and go to court and ask the judge to review the case. Police officers can only de-escalate up to the point..were they supposed to sit there on the curb and sing kumbaya until the cows come home because this bicyclist didn't want to act like a grownup?


Jess

You compared her to a driver with a weapon which is absurd. Police officers are trained on how to handle each situation and unfortunately to often police use excessive force for people of color or even worse kill them... just recently a woman was killed in her home by a police officer who did not identify himself but rather shot her through the windows because she had picked up her weapon.. well if I hear noises in my backyard and the person has not identified themselves I would feel the need to defend my home to.. this is what people are fighting for for police to be responsible to use the appropriate force not sit on a woman’s back that only weighs 100 lbs or pull her leg from under her. She was not a threat.


JackkieOh

Alright, well when they start arresting the actual tweakers riding around town SO ACTUALLY DANGEROUSLY, I'll start caring about all the opinions of you in the comments saying that she was doing something wrong. This situation is obviously influenced by SOMETHING the officers saw that was different from the tweakers driving around town out of the bike lane, crossing traffic without signaling, riding across crosswalks, riding on sidewalks, etc.















Or wait, is that the rest of you white students? I can never tell.








squeakywheelz

The assertion by this author that you must present an ID to a police officer while riding a bicycle is not correct. ID is not required to use a bicycle and you are only required to give your (truthful) information in the event that you are being cited by a police officer. See: https://www.tcnf.legal/refusal_identify/


TruthMatters

It is disappointing to find The Daily Barometer and the Orange Media Network take such a prejudiced stance in this story. The video that was posted shows little of the actual interaction between the police officers and the young lady. Whether deliberately edited or not, it supports a biased viewpoint which is pervasive throughout both articles that were written. One witness is quoted about what she “thinks” and how she “feels” but lacks the facts of what actually happened. With the sensitivity around these types of situations, the undue harm that can be caused for both the student body and the Oregon State Police from writing an article without knowing the facts of the situation is irresponsible and poor journalism. Borderline sensationalism which is why networks like FOX news is so abhorrent.



This article is a discredit to The Daily Barometer and shows neither leadership or innovation which the Orange Media Network claims to strive for. We live in a time where the media is under attack as being biased and it is disappointing that a University newspaper’s actions validates these claims when instead it should lead the charge in proving they are concerned about the truth in journalism. The hope has always been that our students and their advisors would strive to be more..



How to determine whether a news story is biased http://www.fair.org



• Whose point of view was it written from?



• Do stereotypes skew the coverage?



• Is the language loaded?


SaintJacques

I'm sorry, "TriuthMatters," but there is no way that this story is biased. In fact, kudos should be given to Baro reporters for covering a story the Corvallis Gazette-Times thus far neglected to report. The reporter does not use loaded language, there are no stereotypes that skew the accurate coverage of events, and the reporter attempted to let the police present their point of view -- which the police declined to do, since their position on the incident is indefensible. Anyone that actually watched the video in question would acknowledge the moment the officer used his knee on Genesis was excessive, plain and simple. Instead of blaming the Baro for covering an ugly incident on the part of our local constabulary, you should be asking yourself why you are so disconnected from the anger and pain such police actions have caused in our diverse community.


TruthMatters

Reporting without facts escalates the anger and pain unnecessarily and creates a deeper divide in our diverse community. Journalists should strive to help heal the divide by not feeding into the frenzy to satisfy their own agendas. The Gazette-Times article was fair reporting which takes time. Facts take time. Well researched stories take time. Neither of which the Barometer chose to do.


Neutal

This is a never ending story. It seems that every time an Afro-American individual gets pulled over or arrested they scream “Profiled”. What are the police supposed to do, “wait, it is an afro-American, we better not pull them over for breaking the law because they will use the race card”. You don’t see any Caucasian’s using the race profiling when they are arrested by an Afro-American police officer. The only time you see these types of social media post is when an Afro-American gets pulled over. They think that if they play the race card they can get the case dismissed. It doesn’t work like that. It doesn’t matter who committed the crime and who pulls you over. You still broke the law. What happens if she breaks the law again and a Afro-America police officer pulls her over. Is she going to pull the race card and state it is profiling. Everyone says that crime is growing, but complain when the police does something about it. Yes there are others that commit crime and gets away, but only because they were not spotted by the police or nobody calls it in. People need to grow up and stop blaming others for their ignorance


sappj

After reading this, I feel my IQ just dropped 10 points. I cannot point out how well you have proven a stereotype. Thank you for your insight on white people not playing race cards, I get it...somehow only minorities do that. “Grow up and stop blaming others”. Thank you for addressing the issue at hand and erasing the hope I had for Corvallis being a place capable of even recognizing what is wrong when these events become lauded and victims become the problem. Well, if your philosophy is what people accept and tolerate here, now...I feel our generation has failed, and is backsliding into a true state of decay.


Jess

To all of the negative comments .. the DA Is saying himself the charges are garbage. This is clearly an incident where a cop got mad at being questioned.











He says “I don’t see anything (in the body cam video) that could be charged criminally by anyone,” Haroldson said.







Haroldson said a 2017 ruling by the Oregon Supreme Court in a case known as Oregon v. McNally suggests that passive resistance cannot be used as the basis for charging a person with interfering with a peace officer or resisting arrest.







And he added that Hansen may have been within her rights in refusing to show her identification.







Unlike the operator of a motor vehicle, Haroldson said, “there is no statutory requirement that bike riders must show ID if stopped for a traffic violation.”


OSUgradStudent

1.) The videos taken by witnesses start 30 minutes into this situation. 30 minutes that would be crucial to determining how this escalated and why, 2.) Complying with police officers in any setting once they have stopped you equates to you going home safe and likely with little to no citation, 3.) The use of force from what I see looks like as soon as she sees the officers are going to place their hands on her to cuff her she backs up and falls backwards, pulling the officers with her...once they are on the ground and she is cuffed, she refuses order and repeatedly attempts to sit up, which can be construed as an attempt to flee. 4.) If she had provided ID and said "You know, Officer I may have been in the middle of the road, but with these narrow neighborhood streets and the fact that Corvallis is a bicycle friendly community, I was wondering if we could chat about the need for a citation. 5.) Where is her bicycle helmet--is there no law in Corvallis that helmets must be worn? 6.) Everyone on both sides should have taken a deep breath and been nicer to one another. 7.) Was there a possible racial bias at play here? I'm no mind reader, but the police were reacting to the behavior, not the person.


DMC

Police are not above the law either. In fact they should KNOW the law, as should all citizens (and OSUgradStudent - Helmets for bicylists are only required for children up to age 16 in Oregon). Here are your constitutional (the highest law of the land) rights if stopped by police: https://www.aclu-or.org/en/know-your-rights/your-rights-when-stopped-police-oregon . Ed Ray should kick OSP off campus.


OSUgradStudent

Yes, kick OSU PD off campus. The next time an assault, rape, or active shooter incident occurs, you will complain at the response time won't you.


Eshorvath

Stop ignoring the police's request for ID. Stop being an entitled brat. Stop being a drama queen. Stop breaking the law. You are. Ot above the law...you are a brat.


Sheena

Wrong.

Increase your knowledge of the law before you pile on the hate.

Oregon law has exactly ZERO requirements for production of ID on bicycle.

In issues where there are instructions which are lawful and necessary, I’m right there with you! I believe that we should respect authority and honor the need for officers to ensure their safety when protecting the community. However, this was an officer trying to force a non-violent, non-threatening citizen to comply with an illegal request.

It wasn't she who was the brat - it was he....as demonstrated by his failure to produce any code or violation documentation to verify the validity of his ever-increasing tantrum. He couldn't outsmart the woman, and so he forced her to submit in his haze of head-cold annoyance and insecurity.

If an officer tells a woman she must get on her knees and open her mouth so he can stick the barrel of a gun in her jaw, and she politely and respectfully refuses because she knows her rights, would you stand up at her funeral and shout that she should have just complied and stopped being a brat?! Because the law has ZERO requirements of complying with this order, too.

I welcome intelligent discussion as a member of a long line of familial law enforcers who honor and respect the law and the rights of human beings. Anything other than intellectual and respectful convo, don't bother.

gaoyingvigoa

I fought in court (represented myself), yet was taken advantage by the district attorney in Benton County and was convicted with a misdemeanor charge. (Right before the court starts, I was told by the district attorney that I am not allowed to use my only defense evidence--my medical docuements, due to "hear say" rule, which I had not heard about before!) I know in my heart that I am innocent! I have fronzen shoulder, my arm was hurting a lot during the arrest. (The officer lied in his report that I was resisting arrest! Honestly, I hadn't even time to react when he twisted my arm back!) I was also suffering from uncontroled grave's disease and was recovering from an hypoglycemic episode at that time. (I have type one diabetes and my blood sugar was 42 right before the arrest!) The reason why I went to the OSP office was because I tried to explain to the Security Guard from OSU (Officer Parker), who had been given me troubles before and had just snug a 400 dollar fine for parking at ADA parking spot to check my blood sugar. I was in my van at the time. The officer arrested has a name of Katsikis, I will never forget. I confronted him in court, knowing that he doesn't know the severity of Uncontrolled Grave's Disease, which can cause death due to Thyroid Storm. He doesn't know the differences between type one and type two diabetes. During the trial, officer Katsikis can't look at me straight in my eyes. That is the only closer I get from the experience! Maybe he is a good person in his heart. I am now wearing Dexcom sensor and taking better care of myself. But I LOST SOME TRUST IN OUR JUSTICE SYSTEM. I did all I can, wrote a complaint letter to OSP, OSU, and fought in court. I feel bad for the victims out there, and I hope we can do the right thing next time!


gaoyingvigoa

I was arrested in May 2016.


lukeyamaguchi

The sad thing here is that this whole debacle could have been avoided. But that would have required an understanding of history and systemic racism in the U.S. Without that context, it's difficult to understand why the black woman didn't simply cooperate with the officer's demands. If you do understand that context, then you can easily understand why she didn't cooperate with the officer (not to mention the fact that she wasn't legally required to provide ID to the officer in the first place).


nicknitro

There is not a statutory requirement that bicycle riders must present identification when lawfully pulled over for a traffic violation. With that said she was 100% correct not giving her I.D. So you can be arrested for failing to ID when the Oregon law states you don't have to?

EricTse

She was arrested in 2017 for theft after pleading guilty and was given a very generous sentence of only probation. Guess she hasn't learned her lesson yet.

EricTse

Genesis Hansen, arrested for theft in 2017.

Sheena

Yes, the Genesis Hansen arrest is absolutely a civil rights violation, bordering on law enforcement hate-targeting of a minority. But, here’s why it’s actually a greater violation targeting her GENDER.

Here is where it becomes excessive force and gender bias -

Admittedly in the video, the officer is intending to give her a warning initially.

The law does not require one to possess a driver’s license to operate a bicycle.

The law does not require one to produce identification when riding a bicycle.

Because she is abiding by her state laws and rights, is politely questioning authority and the requirements laid out by documented laws, and is legally not producing identification, his annoyance makes him escalate to wanting to give her a citation.

And when he cannot produce a valid law or statute to dispute her credible and reasonable assertion of her rights, he escalates it to an unnecessary arrest. Go ahead, sir, puff out that big-man chest! You’re such a badasssss!!

The officer is annoyed that she is more knowledgeable, he’s frustrated with his head cold and has a short fuse - this cannot be more clear than when he complains about her awareness of the law and her rights to another officer, as if intelligence is criminal and ignorance would have bought her a pass out of this situation.

And so, as the dominant, older male who is twice her size (the very thing she verbalized to him earlier as a fear), he manhandles a peaceful, law-abiding woman who is not resisting and who is pleading to not be touched and begging to be allowed to remove HERSELF from the very vulnerable and submissive position they have put her in. How do you know you didn’t just traumatize a recent rape victim? How do you know you didn’t just undo years of therapy and growth from a survivor of bondage and domestic violence? Though she may not be at all, there are small indications that she’s at least endured some level of fear and lasting impressions. Didn’t her pleas and cries for you to stop touching her and let her please sit up herself have any cause to make you reconsider?

Congrats, boys, you hog-tied and dominated the girl who was out-witting you. Feel better?

Oh, but, don’t bother waiting until the female officer arrives to actually initiate the arrest, noooooo, instead, put her under your control and force her to submit, and THEN, as if you are a chivalrous man, call for the female officer. Because, of course, you couldn’t wait that extra 5 minutes for her to be arrested with a female officer….no, she was an IMMINENT threat to you and the community, right? WRONG.

She was an imminent threat to your ego and the lack of virility you possess as an insecure and disrespectful male.

I suppose it could have been worse. If she were an ethnically diverse male, you would have just shot them…but murder and emotional/physical domination are just another day at the office for select few, corrupt, insecure, and egotistical folks who never should have been awarded a uniform to begin with.

Oh, and for those of you who complain that she should have just complied? In issues where there are instructions which are lawful and necessary, I’m right there with you! I believe that we should respect authority and honor the need for officers to ensure their safety when protecting the community. However, this was an officer trying to force a non-violent, non-threatening citizen to comply with an illegal request.

If an officer tells her she must get on her knees an open her mouth so he can stick the barrel of the gun between her lips, and she politely refuses because she knows her rights, would you stand up at her funeral and shout that she should have just complied?!

Don’t be daft.

PDXFair

Arrest him!

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